TWEETS

Full retail credit with no subtractions. Customers protected from fees and additional charges. Rules actively encourage use of DG.

A

Generally good net metering policies with full retail credit, but there could be certain fees or costs that detract from full retail equivalent value. There may be some obstacles to net metering.

B

Adequate net metering rules, but there could be some significant fees or other obstacles that undercut the value or make the process of net metering more difficult.

C

Poor net metering policies with substantial charges or other hindrances. Many customers will forgo an opportunity to install DG because net metering rules subtract substantial economic value.

D

Net metering policies that deter customer-sited DG.

F

No Statewide Policy

N/A

alabama

F

alaska

C

arizona

F

arkansas

A

california

A

colorado

A

connecticut

A

delaware

A

Dist. of Columbia

A

florida

B

georgia

F

hawaii

F

idaho

C

illinois

A

indiana

B

iowa

B

kansas

C

kentucky

B

louisiana

C

maine

B

maryland

A

massachusetts

A

michigan

B

minnesota

B

mississippi

F

missouri

B

montana

C

nebraska

B

nevada

F

new hampshire

A

new jersey

A

new mexico

B

new york

A

north carolina

C

north dakota

D

ohio

A

oklahoma

F

oregon

A

pennsylvania

A

puerto rico

N/A

rhode island

A

south carolina

B

south dakota

F

tennessee

F

texas

F

utah

A

vermont

B

virginia

C

west virginia

A

wisconsin

D

wyoming

D

  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017

New York

ANet Metering AInterconnection
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • D
  • B
  • D
  • B
  • B
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • C
  • C
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • A

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Fuel Cells, CHP/Cogeneration, Anaerobic Digestion, Microturbines

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities

System Capacity Limit

2 MW for non-residential solar or wind; 500 kW for agricultural wind or biogas; 25 kW for residential solar or wind; 10 kW for residential micro-CHP and fuel cells

Aggregate Capacity Limit

3% of utility's 2005 demand for solar, agricultural biogas, residential micro-CHP and fuel cells; 0.3% of utility's 2005 demand for wind

Net Excess Generation

Generally credited to customer's next bill at retail rate, except avoided cost for micro-CHP and fuel cells; excess generally reconciled annually at avoided-cost rate, except excess for non-residential wind and solar and residential micro-CHP and fuel cells carries over indefinitely

REC Ownership

Not addressed

Meter Aggregation

Allowed for non-residential and farm-based customers

recommendations

  • Credit net excess generation at the retail rate and provide the option of indefinite rollover at retail rate Give customers REC ownership

notes

New York has put itself in the forefront of both supportive net metering policy and consideration of the future evolution of distributed generation. In response to concerns over net metering availability, in 2013 the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) increased the aggregate net metering cap for solar (and some other renewable energy systems) from 1% to 3% of a utilitys 2005 peak demand. In recognition of that achieving the states ambitious solar energy goals under the NY-SUN program, in 2014 it further directed any utility in danger of reaching the new aggregate cap to pro-actively file a request to increase its cap. The PSC considers this policy to be an interim measure to avoid undermining the market while it considers broad changes to the existing distribution network and demand-side resources regulatory regime under the ongoing Reforming our Energy Vision initiative. The results of this initiative will be central to determining how net metering and customer-sited generation are addressed long into the future. In 2015 the state increased the net metering program capacity and established a new community solar option, further increasing its net metering score.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Fuel Cells, CHP/Cogeneration, Anaerobic Digestion, Microturbines

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities

System Capacity Limit

2 MW for non-residential solar or wind; 500 kW for agricultural wind or biogas; 25 kW for residential solar or wind; 10 kW for residential micro-CHP and fuel cells

Aggregate Capacity Limit

3% of utility's 2005 demand for solar, agricultural biogas, residential micro-CHP and fuel cells; 0.3% of utility's 2005 demand for wind

Net Excess Generation

Generally credited to customer's next bill at retail rate, except avoided cost for micro-CHP and fuel cells; excess generally reconciled annually at avoided-cost rate, except excess for non-residential wind and solar and residential micro-CHP and fuel cells carries over indefinitely

REC Ownership

Not addressed

Meter Aggregation

Allowed for non-residential and farm-based customers

recommendations

  • Credit net excess generation at the retail rate and provide the option of indefinite rollover at retail rate Give customers REC ownership

notes

New York has put itself in the forefront of both supportive net metering policy and consideration of the future evolution of distributed generation. In response to concerns over net metering availability, in 2013 the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) increased the aggregate net metering cap for solar (and some other renewable energy systems) from 1% to 3% of a utilitys 2005 peak demand. In recognition of that achieving the states ambitious solar energy goals under the NY-SUN program, in 2014 it further directed any utility in danger of reaching the new aggregate cap to pro-actively file a request to increase its cap. The PSC considers this policy to be an interim measure to avoid undermining the market while it considers broad changes to the existing distribution network and demand-side resources regulatory regime under the ongoing Reforming our Energy Vision initiative. The results of this initiative will be central to determining how net metering and customer-sited generation are addressed long into the future. In 2015 the state increased the net metering program capacity and established a new community solar option, further increasing its net metering score.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Other Distributed Generation Technologies, Microturbines

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

System Capacity Limit

Investor-owned utilities

Standard Agreement

5 MW

Insurance Requirements

N/A

External Disconnect Switch

N/A

Net Metering Required

N/A

recommendations

  • N/A

notes

New York has put itself in the forefront of both supportive net metering policy and consideration of the future evolution of distributed generation. In response to concerns over net metering availability, in 2013 the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) increased the aggregate net metering cap for solar (and some other renewable energy systems) from 1% to 3% of a utilitys 2005 peak demand. In recognition of that achieving the states ambitious solar energy goals under the NY-SUN program, in 2014 it further directed any utility in danger of reaching the new aggregate cap to pro-actively file a request to increase its cap. The PSC considers this policy to be an interim measure to avoid undermining the market while it considers broad changes to the existing distribution network and demand-side resources regulatory regime under the ongoing Reforming our Energy Vision initiative. The results of this initiative will be central to determining how net metering and customer-sited generation are addressed long into the future. In 2015 the state increased the net metering program capacity and established a new community solar option, further increasing its net metering score.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Geothermal Electric, Solar Thermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Combined Heat & Power, Fuel Cells using Non-Renewable Fuels, Landfill Gas, Wind (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Other Distributed Generation Technologies, Microturbines

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit, Residential, Schools, State Government, Federal Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

System Capacity Limit

Investor-owned utilities

Bonus

N/A

recommendations

  • N/A

notes

New York has put itself in the forefront of both supportive net metering policy and consideration of the future evolution of distributed generation. In response to concerns over net metering availability, in 2013 the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) increased the aggregate net metering cap for solar (and some other renewable energy systems) from 1% to 3% of a utilitys 2005 peak demand. In recognition of that achieving the states ambitious solar energy goals under the NY-SUN program, in 2014 it further directed any utility in danger of reaching the new aggregate cap to pro-actively file a request to increase its cap. The PSC considers this policy to be an interim measure to avoid undermining the market while it considers broad changes to the existing distribution network and demand-side resources regulatory regime under the ongoing Reforming our Energy Vision initiative. The results of this initiative will be central to determining how net metering and customer-sited generation are addressed long into the future. In 2015 the state increased the net metering program capacity and established a new community solar option, further increasing its net metering score.