TWEETS

Full retail credit with no subtractions. Customers protected from fees and additional charges. Rules actively encourage use of DG.

A

Generally good net metering policies with full retail credit, but there could be certain fees or costs that detract from full retail equivalent value. There may be some obstacles to net metering.

B

Adequate net metering rules, but there could be some significant fees or other obstacles that undercut the value or make the process of net metering more difficult.

C

Poor net metering policies with substantial charges or other hindrances. Many customers will forgo an opportunity to install DG because net metering rules subtract substantial economic value.

D

Net metering policies that deter customer-sited DG.

F

No Statewide Policy

N/A

alabama

F

alaska

C

arizona

F

arkansas

A

california

A

colorado

A

connecticut

A

delaware

A

Dist. of Columbia

A

florida

B

georgia

F

hawaii

F

idaho

C

illinois

A

indiana

B

iowa

B

kansas

C

kentucky

B

louisiana

C

maine

B

maryland

A

massachusetts

A

michigan

B

minnesota

B

mississippi

F

missouri

B

montana

C

nebraska

B

nevada

F

new hampshire

A

new jersey

A

new mexico

B

new york

A

north carolina

C

north dakota

D

ohio

A

oklahoma

F

oregon

A

pennsylvania

A

puerto rico

N/A

rhode island

A

south carolina

B

south dakota

F

tennessee

F

texas

F

utah

A

vermont

B

virginia

C

west virginia

A

wisconsin

D

wyoming

D

  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017

New Jersey

ANet Metering BInterconnection
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B
  • B

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Geothermal Electric, Anaerobic Digestion, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Tribal Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities (electric distribution companies); electric suppliers

System Capacity Limit

System must be sized not to exceed the customers electricity consumption during the previous year

Aggregate Capacity Limit

No limit specified (commission may limit to 2.5% of peak demand)

Net Excess Generation

Generally credited to customer's next bill at retail rate; excess reconciled at end of annual period at avoided-cost rate

REC Ownership

Customer owns RECs

Meter Aggregation

Allowed, but retail credit is limited to host account and all excess valued at wholesale generation rate

recommendations

  • Allow meter aggregation and net metering for shared or community systems

notes

New Jersey's net metering policy has consistently placed it near the top in the individual state rankings. The state could make a number of improvements to improve its score, but for the most part is a good example of the adoption of net metering best practices. One specific element of its score demands special mention: aggregated net metering. New Jersey received a 0 out of a possible score of 1 in this category despite the fact that its net metering law does contain a provision for net metering aggregation of public sector projects. The reason for this is that the regulations implementing aggregate net metering provide a retail offset only the _hostî meter while all other aggregated meters receive only a wholesale credit. Thus the beneficiary meters are not truly engaged in net metering as the term is commonly understood, and aggregated net metering is available in name only.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Geothermal Electric, Anaerobic Digestion, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Tribal Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities (electric distribution companies); electric suppliers

System Capacity Limit

System must be sized not to exceed the customers electricity consumption during the previous year

Aggregate Capacity Limit

No limit specified (commission may limit to 2.5% of peak demand)

Net Excess Generation

Generally credited to customer's next bill at retail rate; excess reconciled at end of annual period at avoided-cost rate

REC Ownership

Customer owns RECs

Meter Aggregation

Allowed, but retail credit is limited to host account and all excess valued at wholesale generation rate

recommendations

  • Allow meter aggregation and net metering for shared or community systems

notes

New Jersey's net metering policy has consistently placed it near the top in the individual state rankings. The state could make a number of improvements to improve its score, but for the most part is a good example of the adoption of net metering best practices. One specific element of its score demands special mention: aggregated net metering. New Jersey received a 0 out of a possible score of 1 in this category despite the fact that its net metering law does contain a provision for net metering aggregation of public sector projects. The reason for this is that the regulations implementing aggregate net metering provide a retail offset only the _hostî meter while all other aggregated meters receive only a wholesale credit. Thus the beneficiary meters are not truly engaged in net metering as the term is commonly understood, and aggregated net metering is available in name only.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Geothermal Electric, Anaerobic Digestion, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities (electric distribution companies)

System Capacity Limit

No limit specified

Standard Agreement

N/A

Insurance Requirements

N/A

External Disconnect Switch

N/A

Net Metering Required

N/A

recommendations

  • Adopt standard interconnection applications

notes

New Jersey's net metering policy has consistently placed it near the top in the individual state rankings. The state could make a number of improvements to improve its score, but for the most part is a good example of the adoption of net metering best practices. One specific element of its score demands special mention: aggregated net metering. New Jersey received a 0 out of a possible score of 1 in this category despite the fact that its net metering law does contain a provision for net metering aggregation of public sector projects. The reason for this is that the regulations implementing aggregate net metering provide a retail offset only the _hostî meter while all other aggregated meters receive only a wholesale credit. Thus the beneficiary meters are not truly engaged in net metering as the term is commonly understood, and aggregated net metering is available in name only.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Geothermal Electric, Anaerobic Digestion, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities (electric distribution companies)

System Capacity Limit

No limit specified

Bonus

N/A

recommendations

  • Adopt standard interconnection applications

notes

New Jersey's net metering policy has consistently placed it near the top in the individual state rankings. The state could make a number of improvements to improve its score, but for the most part is a good example of the adoption of net metering best practices. One specific element of its score demands special mention: aggregated net metering. New Jersey received a 0 out of a possible score of 1 in this category despite the fact that its net metering law does contain a provision for net metering aggregation of public sector projects. The reason for this is that the regulations implementing aggregate net metering provide a retail offset only the _hostî meter while all other aggregated meters receive only a wholesale credit. Thus the beneficiary meters are not truly engaged in net metering as the term is commonly understood, and aggregated net metering is available in name only.