TWEETS

Full retail credit with no subtractions. Customers protected from fees and additional charges. Rules actively encourage use of DG.

A

Generally good net metering policies with full retail credit, but there could be certain fees or costs that detract from full retail equivalent value. There may be some obstacles to net metering.

B

Adequate net metering rules, but there could be some significant fees or other obstacles that undercut the value or make the process of net metering more difficult.

C

Poor net metering policies with substantial charges or other hindrances. Many customers will forgo an opportunity to install DG because net metering rules subtract substantial economic value.

D

Net metering policies that deter customer-sited DG.

F

No Statewide Policy

N/A

alabama

F

alaska

C

arizona

A

arkansas

A

california

A

colorado

A

connecticut

A

delaware

A

Dist. of Columbia

A

florida

B

georgia

F

hawaii

F

idaho

D

illinois

B

indiana

B

iowa

B

kansas

C

kentucky

B

louisiana

B

maine

B

maryland

A

massachusetts

A

michigan

B

minnesota

A

mississippi

F

missouri

B

montana

C

nebraska

B

nevada

F

new hampshire

A

new jersey

A

new mexico

B

new york

A

north carolina

C

north dakota

D

ohio

A

oklahoma

F

oregon

A

pennsylvania

A

puerto rico

N/A

rhode island

A

south carolina

B

south dakota

F

tennessee

F

texas

F

utah

A

vermont

A

virginia

C

west virginia

A

wisconsin

D

wyoming

D

  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017

Massachusetts

ANet Metering AInterconnection
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • C
  • B
  • B
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • C
  • B
  • B
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A
  • A

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Fuel Cells, Municipal Solid Waste, CHP/Cogeneration, Anaerobic Digestion, Small Hydroelectric, Other Distributed Generation Technologies

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities

System Capacity Limit

10 MW for net metering by a municipality or other governmental entity; 2 MW for all other "Class III" systems; 1 MW for all other "Class II" systems; 60 kW for all other "Class I" systems

Aggregate Capacity Limit

3% of utility's peak load

Net Excess Generation

Varies by system type and customer class

REC Ownership

Customer owns RECs

Meter Aggregation

Neighborhood net metering allowed

recommendations

  • Increase overall enrollment Extend net metering to all municipal electric utilities

notes

The Massachusetts net metering cap has been hit in utility territories comprising more than half the state. Massachusetts has established a complex policy that includes three different classes of systems, with certain policy provisions varying by system class. Significantly, Massachusettss policy explicitly allows neighborhood net metering, a shared renewable-energy arrangement, and third-party ownership of systems. Interestingly, Massachusetts has established a System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility, an online tool that enables customers to apply for and reserve space for a planned system under the established aggregate program cap. This site provides real-time updates and detailed information on cap allocations provided, including historical reports on available capacity under the established program cap.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Fuel Cells, Municipal Solid Waste, CHP/Cogeneration, Anaerobic Digestion, Small Hydroelectric, Other Distributed Generation Technologies

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government, Agricultural, Institutional

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities

System Capacity Limit

10 MW for net metering by a municipality or other governmental entity; 2 MW for all other "Class III" systems; 1 MW for all other "Class II" systems; 60 kW for all other "Class I" systems

Aggregate Capacity Limit

3% of utility's peak load

Net Excess Generation

Varies by system type and customer class

REC Ownership

Customer owns RECs

Meter Aggregation

Neighborhood net metering allowed

recommendations

  • Increase overall enrollment Extend net metering to all municipal electric utilities

notes

The Massachusetts net metering cap has been hit in utility territories comprising more than half the state. Massachusetts has established a complex policy that includes three different classes of systems, with certain policy provisions varying by system class. Significantly, Massachusettss policy explicitly allows neighborhood net metering, a shared renewable-energy arrangement, and third-party ownership of systems. Interestingly, Massachusetts has established a System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility, an online tool that enables customers to apply for and reserve space for a planned system under the established aggregate program cap. This site provides real-time updates and detailed information on cap allocations provided, including historical reports on available capacity under the established program cap.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Fuel Cells, Municipal Solid Waste, CHP/Cogeneration, Microturbines, Other Distributed Generation Technologies

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities

System Capacity Limit

No limit specified

Standard Agreement

N/A

Insurance Requirements

N/A

External Disconnect Switch

N/A

Net Metering Required

Applications and agreements accepted electronically; Dispute resolution process adopted to address disputes; Indemnification requirements waived for government entities; Standardized interconnection agreement adopted that applies to all utilities

recommendations

  • Prohibit the use of a redundant external disconnect switch Prohibit requirements for additional insurance

notes

The Massachusetts net metering cap has been hit in utility territories comprising more than half the state. Massachusetts has established a complex policy that includes three different classes of systems, with certain policy provisions varying by system class. Significantly, Massachusettss policy explicitly allows neighborhood net metering, a shared renewable-energy arrangement, and third-party ownership of systems. Interestingly, Massachusetts has established a System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility, an online tool that enables customers to apply for and reserve space for a planned system under the established aggregate program cap. This site provides real-time updates and detailed information on cap allocations provided, including historical reports on available capacity under the established program cap.

Eligible Renewable/Other Technologies

Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Geothermal Electric, Fuel Cells, Municipal Solid Waste, CHP/Cogeneration, Microturbines, Other Distributed Generation Technologies

Applicable Sectors

Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Nonprofit, Schools, Local Government, State Government, Fed. Government

Applicable Utilities

Investor-owned utilities

System Capacity Limit

No limit specified

Bonus

N/A

recommendations

  • Prohibit the use of a redundant external disconnect switch Prohibit requirements for additional insurance

notes

The Massachusetts net metering cap has been hit in utility territories comprising more than half the state. Massachusetts has established a complex policy that includes three different classes of systems, with certain policy provisions varying by system class. Significantly, Massachusettss policy explicitly allows neighborhood net metering, a shared renewable-energy arrangement, and third-party ownership of systems. Interestingly, Massachusetts has established a System of Assurance of Net Metering Eligibility, an online tool that enables customers to apply for and reserve space for a planned system under the established aggregate program cap. This site provides real-time updates and detailed information on cap allocations provided, including historical reports on available capacity under the established program cap.