TWEETS

Full retail credit with no subtractions. Customers protected from fees and additional charges. Rules actively encourage use of DG.

A

Generally good net metering policies with full retail credit, but there could be certain fees or costs that detract from full retail equivalent value. There may be some obstacles to net metering.

B

Adequate net metering rules, but there could be some significant fees or other obstacles that undercut the value or make the process of net metering more difficult.

C

Poor net metering policies with substantial charges or other hindrances. Many customers will forgo an opportunity to install DG because net metering rules subtract substantial economic value.

D

Net metering policies that deter customer-sited DG.

F

No Statewide Policy

N/A

alabama

N/A

alaska

C

arizona

A

arkansas

B

california

A

colorado

A

connecticut

A

delaware

A

Dist. of Columbia

A

florida

B

georgia

F

hawaii

B

idaho

N/A

illinois

B

indiana

B

iowa

B

kansas

B

kentucky

B

louisiana

B

maine

B

maryland

A

massachusetts

A

michigan

B

minnesota

B

mississippi

N/A

missouri

B

montana

C

nebraska

B

nevada

A

new hampshire

A

new jersey

A

new mexico

B

new york

A

north carolina

C

north dakota

D

ohio

A

oklahoma

F

oregon

A

pennsylvania

A

puerto rico

N/A

rhode island

B

south carolina

D

south dakota

N/A

tennessee

N/A

texas

N/A

utah

A

vermont

A

virginia

D

west virginia

A

wisconsin

D

wyoming

B

  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014

Vermont streamlines process for small net metered systems

On May 31, the Vermont Public Service Board issued an order to increase the system size capacity for proposed net-metered photovoltaic (PV) systems to qualify for an expedited registration process. This order promulgates Act No. 125 (H.475), enacted earlier this year, which increased the size limit of systems eligible for the expedited process.  Net-metered PV systems up to 10 kW may now qualify for this expedited permitting process for a Certificate of Public Good (CPG); previously the limit was 5 kW.  In short, small PV systems now have fewer hurdles to jump through which ultimately means solar can be installed more quickly, with less cost to the customer.

 

The registration process for a CPG requires the customer to self-certify that they will comply with certain interconnection requirements.  For systems up to 10 kW, the interconnecting utility has 10 days to let the customer know if there are any interconnection concerns with the proposed system.  If the utility does not file an objection to an interconnection project within this time period, a CPG will be deemed issued by the Board on the eleventh day following the filing of the registration form and the applicant may commence construction of the system.  If the utility does file an objection, the applicant must wait to begin construction of the project until the interconnection issues have been resolved.