TWEETS

Full retail credit with no subtractions. Customers protected from fees and additional charges. Rules actively encourage use of DG.

A

Generally good net metering policies with full retail credit, but there could be certain fees or costs that detract from full retail equivalent value. There may be some obstacles to net metering.

B

Adequate net metering rules, but there could be some significant fees or other obstacles that undercut the value or make the process of net metering more difficult.

C

Poor net metering policies with substantial charges or other hindrances. Many customers will forgo an opportunity to install DG because net metering rules subtract substantial economic value.

D

Net metering policies that deter customer-sited DG.

F

No Statewide Policy

N/A

alabama

F

alaska

C

arizona

A

arkansas

A

california

A

colorado

A

connecticut

A

delaware

A

Dist. of Columbia

A

florida

B

georgia

F

hawaii

F

idaho

D

illinois

B

indiana

B

iowa

B

kansas

C

kentucky

B

louisiana

B

maine

B

maryland

A

massachusetts

A

michigan

B

minnesota

A

mississippi

F

missouri

B

montana

C

nebraska

B

nevada

F

new hampshire

A

new jersey

A

new mexico

B

new york

A

north carolina

C

north dakota

D

ohio

A

oklahoma

F

oregon

A

pennsylvania

A

puerto rico

N/A

rhode island

A

south carolina

B

south dakota

F

tennessee

F

texas

F

utah

A

vermont

A

virginia

C

west virginia

A

wisconsin

D

wyoming

D

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Freeing the Grid 2011 is out! More states make the grade

Never a slow moment in U.S. solar policy news these days. Just this morning we released Freeing the Grid 2011, our fifth annual report card on state net metering and interconnection policies. Together these two policies empower Americans to generate their own electricity from solar and other renewables. And the good news is states of all shapes, colors and political persuasions continue to embrace these fundamentals of a strong distributed renewable market. We’re also particularly pleased to note that the report methodology was used by the U.S. DOE in scoring Sunshot, their exciting initiative to lower the cost of going solar in the U.S. by 75% by 2020 – further recognition of the important role that these wonky-but-critical state policies play in making solar cost effective for energy consumers.

(more…)